Bitcoin Faces Pressure but Rebound Hopes Remain, Says Grayscale Analyst

Bitcoin has experienced a significant drop of over 10% in the past week, falling from around $63,000 to just under $54,000. Despite this decline, Grayscale's Head of Research, Zach Pandl, suggests that a rebound may still be possible. Factors influencing Bitcoin's price include Germany's ongoing sale of seized Bitcoin, which continues to exert downward pressure, and potential bullish catalysts such as a dovish shift from Fed Chair Jerome Powell and the anticipated debut of Ethereum ETFs. While investors have shown interest in buying the dip, pouring over $140 million into Bitcoin ETFs, the continued sell pressure from Germany's remaining $2 billion Bitcoin stash could lead to further downside movements, potentially affecting newer Bitcoin buyers who entered at higher price points.

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Powell to Defend Fed's 'Higher-for-Longer' Rate Policy in Congressional Testimony

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell is set to testify before Congress this week, facing pressure from lawmakers on multiple fronts. He will likely defend the Fed's stance on maintaining high interest rates to combat inflation, despite growing impatience for rate cuts. Powell will also address concerns about the Fed's plan to increase capital requirements for major banks. As his last scheduled public address to Congress before the presidential election, Powell must navigate these issues while asserting the Fed's political independence. Recent economic data showing a slowdown in inflation may influence the discussion, but Powell is expected to maintain a cautious approach to potential rate cuts.

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12 Nations Leading the Charge Seeking Dollar Alternatives

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) reports a gradual decline in the US dollar's share of global foreign reserves as numerous countries, particularly those in the ASEAN and BRICS alliances, adopt 'de-dollarization' strategies. These nations are moving away from the US dollar in favor of alternative currencies for various political, economic, and geographical reasons. The article lists 12 countries actively reducing their reliance on the US dollar, signaling a shift in the global financial landscape and potentially challenging the dollar's long-standing dominance as the world's primary reserve currency.

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Fed Could Slash Rates by 200 Points Over 8 Meetings, Citi Analysts Predict

Citi Research analysts predict an aggressive series of interest rate cuts by the Federal Reserve, starting in September 2024 and continuing through July 2025. They anticipate eight consecutive 25 basis point cuts, totaling a 200 basis point reduction, which would lower the benchmark rate from 5.25%-5.5% to 3.25%-3.5%. This forecast is based on recent economic indicators suggesting a slowdown, including a reversal in the service sector gauge and rising unemployment. Citi cites dovish comments from Fed Chair Powell and various signs of economic weakness, particularly in the job market, as supporting their prediction. They also warn of the potential for a sharper economic downturn and the possibility of triggering the "Sahm Rule" recession indicator if unemployment continues to rise at its current pace.

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June Inflation Report: A Potential Game-Changer for Fed Policy and Markets

The upcoming U.S. inflation report for June, set to be released on Thursday, is poised to be a pivotal event for financial markets. This report could significantly influence the Federal Reserve's decision on interest rate cuts, potentially impacting the timing of the first cut. A lower-than-expected inflation reading might encourage Fed Chair Jerome Powell to signal a rate cut in September, or even open the possibility of a cut as early as July. Conversely, a higher-than-anticipated inflation figure could halt the current stock market rally. The report's importance is heightened by its potential to affect various market sectors, including stocks, Treasury debt, and even the presidential election race, making it a focal point for investors and economists alike.

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